29 9 / 2014


Cup Size Isn’t Everything

TRUE&CO. USES EXTENSIVE CUSTOMER FEEDBACK TO DESIGN BRAS THAT REALLY FIT.

Bra shopping has never been a very satisfying experience for women, who are often faced with oversexualized advertising, inexperienced bra fitters, and harshly lit dressing rooms. But the problems begin with the way bras are sized. “It doesn’t matter if you are a 32C or a 32B; the band and cup size tell only half the story,” Lam explains. What neither metric accounts for is the curvature of the breast (shallow or full) or the weight distribution of the breasts (where they sit on a woman’s chest). This is where the biggest variation occurs among women, meaning that even a bra in your size might cause you to spill over or have fat rolls under your arms or straps that won’t stay up—and in ways both physical and psychological, make a woman look less attractive.
True&Co. is out to correct all of the unpleasantness. The differences start on its home page, where large type induces visitors to “take the quiz.” “The quiz” is True&Co.’s primary data-gathering mechanism: You answer a series of questions—“How does your band fit?” “How do your breasts rest in your bra?”—and the company’s algorithm fills a personalized shop with bras, selected from more than 50 lingerie brands, that are most likely to fit your particular size and shape. (Eighty-six percent of the bras True&Co. fit-tests don’t fit a single one of the body types identified and never make it into the algorithm.) You can either purchase bras outright or have up to five of your choosing sent to you, at no cost, to try on. You can send back the ones you don’t want; True&Co. will charge you for what you keep. Then you’re invited to complete another short survey about how each bra fit you.

Read more

TRUE&CO. USES EXTENSIVE CUSTOMER FEEDBACK TO DESIGN BRAS THAT REALLY FIT.

Bra shopping has never been a very satisfying experience for women, who are often faced with oversexualized advertising, inexperienced bra fitters, and harshly lit dressing rooms. But the problems begin with the way bras are sized. “It doesn’t matter if you are a 32C or a 32B; the band and cup size tell only half the story,” Lam explains. What neither metric accounts for is the curvature of the breast (shallow or full) or the weight distribution of the breasts (where they sit on a woman’s chest). This is where the biggest variation occurs among women, meaning that even a bra in your size might cause you to spill over or have fat rolls under your arms or straps that won’t stay up—and in ways both physical and psychological, make a woman look less attractive.

True&Co. is out to correct all of the unpleasantness. The differences start on its home page, where large type induces visitors to “take the quiz.” “The quiz” is True&Co.’s primary data-gathering mechanism: You answer a series of questions—“How does your band fit?” “How do your breasts rest in your bra?”—and the company’s algorithm fills a personalized shop with bras, selected from more than 50 lingerie brands, that are most likely to fit your particular size and shape. (Eighty-six percent of the bras True&Co. fit-tests don’t fit a single one of the body types identified and never make it into the algorithm.) You can either purchase bras outright or have up to five of your choosing sent to you, at no cost, to try on. You can send back the ones you don’t want; True&Co. will charge you for what you keep. Then you’re invited to complete another short survey about how each bra fit you.

Read more

28 9 / 2014

Bringing Body Love Into Dance Class: A New Way of Teaching

by Amanda Trusty

We giggle a lot when we talk about our muscles and our imagery, but while we are at the barre and we are dancing, everyone is extremely focused on using their new muscle memory to their advantage. It’s amazing to me to see these girls self-correct themselves without me ever saying “suck it in” or “tuck under.”

All I have to say is, “where’s your tailfeather headed?” and the plié changes drastically. Say, “I can’t see what color your necklace is” to a student, and watch their posture change immediately.

My goal is to teach the girls all the amazing things their bodies can do, and I never bring attention to their weight or their body type. In fact, just this past week, we started a new exercise at the barre where I ask each girl what her favorite part of her body is. Most said legs, some said arms, and next week I’ll ask them for a different one. If we start encouraging these young ladies to love their bodies now, the Photoshopped magazines and the Hollywood red carpet will take a longer time to affect them.

Read more of this beautiful article

27 9 / 2014

The case for free tampons

The cost of a product that half the world’s population needs multiple times a day, every month for approximately 30 years, is simply too much


In countries where sanitary products are inaccessible or unaffordable, menstruation can mean missed school for girls (UNICEF estimates 10% of African girls don’t attend school during their periods) and an increased dropout rate, missed work for women and repeated vaginal infections because of unsanitary menstrual products. One study showed that in Bangladesh, 73% of female factory workers miss an average of six days – and six days of pay – every month because of their periods.
(Charities have picked up some of the slack in rural communities across the world – companies like LunaPads, for example, launched Pads4Girls, a program that provides in-kind donations of menstrual products. The organization She helps women start business to create and sell affordable pads, and in some countries like India, local innovators have come up with cheaper alternatives to store-bought products.)
In the United States, access to tampons and pads for low-income women is a real problem, too: food stamps don’t cover feminine hygiene products, so some women resort to selling their food stamps in order to pay for “luxuries” like tampons. Women in prison often don’t have access to sanitary products at all, and the high cost of a product that half the population needs multiple times a day, every month for approximately 30 years, is simply, well, bullshit.
Women in the UK are fighting to axe the 5% tax on tampons (it used to be taxed at 17.5%!), which are considered “luxuries” while men’s razors, for some baffling reason, are not. And in the US, though breast pumps, vasectomies and artificial teeth are sales tax-exempt and tax-deductible medical care, tampons are not even exempted from sales tax in some states (including California and New York, two of the most populous states).
But this is less an issue of costliness than it is of principle: menstrual care is health care, and should be treated as such. But much in the same way insurance coverage or subsidies for birth control are mocked or met with outrage, the idea of women even getting small tax breaks for menstrual products provokes incredulousness because some people lack an incredible amount of empathy … and because it has something to do with vaginas. Affordable access to sanitary products is rarely talked about outside of NGOs – and when it is, it’s with shame or derision.

Read more

The case for free tampons

The cost of a product that half the world’s population needs multiple times a day, every month for approximately 30 years, is simply too much

In countries where sanitary products are inaccessible or unaffordable, menstruation can mean missed school for girls (UNICEF estimates 10% of African girls don’t attend school during their periods) and an increased dropout rate, missed work for women and repeated vaginal infections because of unsanitary menstrual products. One study showed that in Bangladesh, 73% of female factory workers miss an average of six days – and six days of pay – every month because of their periods.

(Charities have picked up some of the slack in rural communities across the world – companies like LunaPads, for example, launched Pads4Girls, a program that provides in-kind donations of menstrual products. The organization She helps women start business to create and sell affordable pads, and in some countries like India, local innovators have come up with cheaper alternatives to store-bought products.)

In the United States, access to tampons and pads for low-income women is a real problem, too: food stamps don’t cover feminine hygiene products, so some women resort to selling their food stamps in order to pay for “luxuries” like tampons. Women in prison often don’t have access to sanitary products at all, and the high cost of a product that half the population needs multiple times a day, every month for approximately 30 years, is simply, well, bullshit.

Women in the UK are fighting to axe the 5% tax on tampons (it used to be taxed at 17.5%!), which are considered “luxuries” while men’s razors, for some baffling reason, are not. And in the US, though breast pumps, vasectomies and artificial teeth are sales tax-exempt and tax-deductible medical care, tampons are not even exempted from sales tax in some states (including California and New York, two of the most populous states).

But this is less an issue of costliness than it is of principle: menstrual care is health care, and should be treated as such. But much in the same way insurance coverage or subsidies for birth control are mocked or met with outrage, the idea of women even getting small tax breaks for menstrual products provokes incredulousness because some people lack an incredible amount of empathy … and because it has something to do with vaginas. Affordable access to sanitary products is rarely talked about outside of NGOs – and when it is, it’s with shame or derision.

Read more

27 9 / 2014

Lingerie Company Redefines ‘Nude’ By Offering Bras For Women Of All Colors (Photos)

Most women have a few bras in their arsenals: a black bra, a t-shirt bra, maybe a push-up bra or strapless style, and always — always — a nude bra.
A nude bra is the most important one: It’s the only one that can be worn with everything.
But what is a “nude” bra?
A nude shade for me is certainly much different than, say, a nude shade on Emma Stone or Rihanna.
Unfortunately, bras don’t come in light nude, olive-skin nude or dark-skin nude.
They come in one shade: caucasian. There’s no nude for the black or Hispanic woman. Only the white woman. Until now.


Read more!!!

Lingerie Company Redefines ‘Nude’ By Offering Bras For Women Of All Colors (Photos)

Most women have a few bras in their arsenals: a black bra, a t-shirt bra, maybe a push-up bra or strapless style, and always — always — a nude bra.

A nude bra is the most important one: It’s the only one that can be worn with everything.

But what is a “nude” bra?

A nude shade for me is certainly much different than, say, a nude shade on Emma Stone or Rihanna.

Unfortunately, bras don’t come in light nude, olive-skin nude or dark-skin nude.

They come in one shade: caucasian. There’s no nude for the black or Hispanic woman. Only the white woman. Until now.

Read more!!!

26 9 / 2014

“I no longer have patience for certain things, not because I’ve become arrogant, but simply because I reached a point in my life where I do not want to waste more time with what displeases me or hurts me. I have no patience for cynicism, excessive criticism and demands of any nature. I lost the will to please those who do not like me, to love those who do not love me and to smile at those who do not want to smile at me. I no longer spend a single minute on those who lie or want to manipulate. I decided not to coexist anymore with pretense, hypocrisy, dishonesty and cheap praise. I do not tolerate selective erudition nor academic arrogance. I do not adjust either to popular gossiping. I hate conflict and comparisons. I believe in a world of opposites and that’s why I avoid people with rigid and inflexible personalities. In friendship I dislike the lack of loyalty and betrayal. I do not get along with those who do not know how to give a compliment or a word of encouragement. Exaggerations bore me and I have difficulty accepting those who do not like animals. And on top of everything I have no patience for anyone who does not deserve my patience.” _ Meryl Streep
[x]

“I no longer have patience for certain things, not because I’ve become arrogant, but simply because I reached a point in my life where I do not want to waste more time with what displeases me or hurts me. I have no patience for cynicism, excessive criticism and demands of any nature. I lost the will to please those who do not like me, to love those who do not love me and to smile at those who do not want to smile at me. I no longer spend a single minute on those who lie or want to manipulate. I decided not to coexist anymore with pretense, hypocrisy, dishonesty and cheap praise. I do not tolerate selective erudition nor academic arrogance. I do not adjust either to popular gossiping. I hate conflict and comparisons. I believe in a world of opposites and that’s why I avoid people with rigid and inflexible personalities. In friendship I dislike the lack of loyalty and betrayal. I do not get along with those who do not know how to give a compliment or a word of encouragement. Exaggerations bore me and I have difficulty accepting those who do not like animals. And on top of everything I have no patience for anyone who does not deserve my patience.” _ Meryl Streep

[x]

26 9 / 2014


Dead at noon: B.C. woman ends her life rather than suffer indignity of dementia (with video)

 

Gillian Bennett’s final words on personal website make a passionate case for physician-assisted suicide

“She wouldn’t let me help her, and I didn’t wish to,” said Jonathan. “I don’t know where she got the Nembutal or the instructions; she didn’t tell me.”
Nor did she let him help her drag the mattress outside, although that final effort was physically difficult for her.
One thing her husband does know for sure: “She was absolutely not frightened. Not even slightly. She was as calm and peaceful as you could imagine.”
After she passed away, Jonathan let go of her hand and called his wife’s doctor, who came and confirmed death and notified the RCMP.
An RCMP officer interviewed Jonathan and together they waited for the coroner.
“The policeman asked me what happened and I told him. He was very good. Efficient and civilized and good,” said Jonathan.
The officer’s respectful treatment was a small comfort. He and his wife knew that if anyone assisted her, they would be breaking the law.
“Gillian and I both disliked and disapproved of the laws making it impossible to help a loved one with something as important as death.”
His brilliant, beautiful wife — who once had a thriving clinical psychotherapy practice — had made the choice she felt was morally and ethically correct.

Read more

 

Gillian Bennett’s final words on personal website make a passionate case for physician-assisted suicide

“She wouldn’t let me help her, and I didn’t wish to,” said Jonathan. “I don’t know where she got the Nembutal or the instructions; she didn’t tell me.”

Nor did she let him help her drag the mattress outside, although that final effort was physically difficult for her.

One thing her husband does know for sure: “She was absolutely not frightened. Not even slightly. She was as calm and peaceful as you could imagine.”

After she passed away, Jonathan let go of her hand and called his wife’s doctor, who came and confirmed death and notified the RCMP.

An RCMP officer interviewed Jonathan and together they waited for the coroner.

“The policeman asked me what happened and I told him. He was very good. Efficient and civilized and good,” said Jonathan.

The officer’s respectful treatment was a small comfort. He and his wife knew that if anyone assisted her, they would be breaking the law.

“Gillian and I both disliked and disapproved of the laws making it impossible to help a loved one with something as important as death.”

His brilliant, beautiful wife — who once had a thriving clinical psychotherapy practice — had made the choice she felt was morally and ethically correct.

Read more

25 9 / 2014

Cartoonist Alison Bechdel ‘in shock’ after winning $625,000 ‘genius’ grant

The graphic memoirist is among 21 recipients of this year’s MacArthur Foundation no-strings-attached stipend

Bechdel is known for her comic strip Dykes to Watch Out For, about the everyday lives of women in the lesbian community, as well as for her graphic memoirs. Fun Home describes how she came out to her parents, only to discover that her father had also had homosexual relationships, and for him to – she believes – kill himself.
Are You My Mother? expanded on her relationship with her mother, exploring, as the Guardian’s review put it, “her childhood, her love affairs, her interactions with two different therapists and, throughout it all, her efforts to get the recognition she has always craved from her mother”.
“I wrote this story about my father and it was painful at times to go back and remember things, to go back and recreate his character, to feel that loss,” she said, in an interview for the MacArthur Foundation.
Describing herself as “a cartoonist”, Bechdel said that what she loved about the medium was “the way you have access to these two different kinds of communication. There’s language, verbal language … I love words, I love braiding, I love putting sentences together. But language remains symbolic; it still has to get filtered through our brains. Whereas drawing – it’s right there, it’s immediate, and you just assimilate it without having to think about it. I love having access to both kinds of communication when I tell my stories.”

Read more

Cartoonist Alison Bechdel ‘in shock’ after winning $625,000 ‘genius’ grant

The graphic memoirist is among 21 recipients of this year’s MacArthur Foundation no-strings-attached stipend

Bechdel is known for her comic strip Dykes to Watch Out For, about the everyday lives of women in the lesbian community, as well as for her graphic memoirs. Fun Home describes how she came out to her parents, only to discover that her father had also had homosexual relationships, and for him to – she believes – kill himself.

Are You My Mother? expanded on her relationship with her mother, exploring, as the Guardian’s review put it, “her childhood, her love affairs, her interactions with two different therapists and, throughout it all, her efforts to get the recognition she has always craved from her mother”.

“I wrote this story about my father and it was painful at times to go back and remember things, to go back and recreate his character, to feel that loss,” she said, in an interview for the MacArthur Foundation.

Describing herself as “a cartoonist”, Bechdel said that what she loved about the medium was “the way you have access to these two different kinds of communication. There’s language, verbal language … I love words, I love braiding, I love putting sentences together. But language remains symbolic; it still has to get filtered through our brains. Whereas drawing – it’s right there, it’s immediate, and you just assimilate it without having to think about it. I love having access to both kinds of communication when I tell my stories.”

Read more

25 9 / 2014

Ray Rice Inspired Makeup Tutorial

by Megan MacKay

A new makeup look inspired by America’s new favourite spousal abuser. 

How to tell if you’re being abused and how to seek help: http://www.womenshealth.gov/violence-…

Directory of transition houses and shelters (Canada):
http://www.phac-aspc.gc.ca/ncfv-cnivf…

Directory of shelters (USA):
http://www.womenshelters.org/

24 9 / 2014

Celebrating Butch: A Powerful Photo Collection on Female Masculinity

In a world where gender is a strictly enforced binary of male or female, female masculinity can make lots of people uncomfortable – who then make it uncomfortable and even dangerous for butch individuals to just be themselves.

In spite of the harassment and violence experienced by butch folk, butch is being reclaimed with pride to more accurately describe people who identify and present female masculinity.

BUTCH is a beautiful, intersectional, and eye-opening photo collection by Meg Allen featuring dozens of butch individuals who show the range, fluidity, and subjectivity of female masculinity.

Click through for more photos

24 9 / 2014

What Polaris win for Tagaq means for Canadian music

The winner of the 2014 Polaris Music Prize was announced as Tanya Tagaq last night in a decision that will go down in Canadian music history as a key moment of transition - no exaggeration needed. While 2013’s quasi-shocker of Godspeed playing king-alts and refusing the prize was perhaps the esteemed, arts-driven, $30,000 music prize’s more dramatic incarnation, Tagaq’s win means so much more for Canadian art - and Canadian people.
[…]
There’s no way to describe Tagaq’s music without the risk of making it sound dull. Throat singing, contemporary-traditional, experimental, vocal explorations - yo, most Canadians are like “change the channel” right here. But as it is when you see any artist who breaks away from known generic constraints and sounds to create a force that is uniquely driven by the power of her own vision, Bjork-collaborating Tagaq has to be experienced to be understood.

Click through for soundcloud track ‘Caribou’ and video

What Polaris win for Tagaq means for Canadian music

The winner of the 2014 Polaris Music Prize was announced as Tanya Tagaq last night in a decision that will go down in Canadian music history as a key moment of transition - no exaggeration needed. While 2013’s quasi-shocker of Godspeed playing king-alts and refusing the prize was perhaps the esteemed, arts-driven, $30,000 music prize’s more dramatic incarnation, Tagaq’s win means so much more for Canadian art - and Canadian people.

[…]

There’s no way to describe Tagaq’s music without the risk of making it sound dull. Throat singing, contemporary-traditional, experimental, vocal explorations - yo, most Canadians are like “change the channel” right here. But as it is when you see any artist who breaks away from known generic constraints and sounds to create a force that is uniquely driven by the power of her own vision, Bjork-collaborating Tagaq has to be experienced to be understood.

Click through for soundcloud track ‘Caribou’ and video