18 7 / 2014

lightspeedsound:

elizajumel:

the first female chinese immigrant to america was a sixteen-year-old girl who was part of a cultural exhibit where she sat in a life-size diorama and people watched her eat with chopsticks while wearing silk clothes and that’s really all you need to know about the commodification of chinese women

It would be really great if you included her name in this post tho.

her name was Afong Moy, stage name “The Chinese Lady.”

And here is more information

(via angrywocunited)

17 7 / 2014

Nadine Gordimer, South African author, dies at 90

Gordimer’s family said she “cared most deeply about South Africa, its culture, its people, and its ongoing struggle to realise its new democracy”.

Committed to fighting apartheid, the author was a leading member of the African National Congress (ANC) and fought for the release of Nelson Mandela.

They went on to become firm friends and she edited Mandela’s famous I Am Prepared To Die speech, which he gave as a defendant during his 1962 trial.

The Nelson Mandela Foundation paid tribute to Gordimer, saying it was “deeply saddened at the loss of South Africa’s grande dame of literature”.

"We have lost a great writer, a patriot and strong voice for equality and democracy in the world," it added.

A number of Gordimer’s books were banned by the South African government under the apartheid regime including 1966’s The Late Bourgeois World and 1979’s Burger’s Daughter.

Her last novel, No Time Like the Present, published in 2012, follows veterans of the battle against apartheid as they deal with the issues facing modern South Africa.

Read more

17 7 / 2014

Raekha Prasad
Friday 16 September 2005

A year ago Usha Narayane was about to embark on a new life. A call-centre worker with a diploma in hotel management, she was 25 and about to travel north from her home in the centre of India to begin a managerial job in a hotel in Punjab. The job would transport her not only geographically but also socially.

Like her neighbours, Narayane is a dalit, an “untouchable”, at the bottom of the caste ladder. Schooling and literacy are rare among the women of Kasturba Nagar, the slum neighbourhood in the city of Nagpur where she grew up. She was unmarried, preferring to work and study. Yet nobody resented her success. Instead, they had high hopes for the girl. But Narayane went nowhere. Today, she is in her family’s one-room, windowless home, awaiting trial for murder.

At 3pm on August 13 2004, Akku Yadav was lynched by a mob of around 200 women from Kasturba Nagar. It took them 15 minutes to hack to death the man they say raped them with impunity for more than a decade. Chilli powder was thrown in his face and stones hurled. As he flailed and fought, one of his alleged victims hacked off his penis with a vegetable knife. A further 70 stab wounds were left on his body. The incident was made all the more extraordinary by its setting. Yadav was murdered not in the dark alleys of the slum, but on the shiny white marble floor of Nagpur district court.

Read more

Update: “Usha Narayane, a local activist, was arrested and charged with murder, as were other women. In 2012, Usha was released from custody.” [x]

17 7 / 2014

Elaine Stritch, Tart-Tongued Broadway Actress and Singer, Is Dead at 89

Plainspoken, egalitarian, impatient with fools and foolishness, and admittedly fond of cigarettes, alcohol and late nights — she finally gave up smoking and drinking in her 60s — though she took it up again — Ms. Stritch might be the only actor to work as a bartender after starring on Broadway, and she was completely unabashed about her good-time-girl attitude.
“I’m not a bit opposed to your mentioning in this article that Frieda Fun here has had a reputation in the theater, for the past five or six years, for drinking,” she said to a reporter for The New York Times in 1968. “I drink and I love to drink, and it’s part of my life.”
Most of the time she was equally unabashed onstage, rarely if ever leaving the sensually astringent elements of her personality behind when she performed.

Read more

Elaine Stritch, Tart-Tongued Broadway Actress and Singer, Is Dead at 89

Plainspoken, egalitarian, impatient with fools and foolishness, and admittedly fond of cigarettes, alcohol and late nights — she finally gave up smoking and drinking in her 60s — though she took it up again — Ms. Stritch might be the only actor to work as a bartender after starring on Broadway, and she was completely unabashed about her good-time-girl attitude.

“I’m not a bit opposed to your mentioning in this article that Frieda Fun here has had a reputation in the theater, for the past five or six years, for drinking,” she said to a reporter for The New York Times in 1968. “I drink and I love to drink, and it’s part of my life.”

Most of the time she was equally unabashed onstage, rarely if ever leaving the sensually astringent elements of her personality behind when she performed.

Read more

17 7 / 2014

Alice Coachman, First Black Woman Olympic Gold Medalist, Dies at 90

Coachman won the first of her 10 straight national titles at age 16 in 1939, according to USA Track and Field, but missed the 1940 and 1944 Olympics due to World War II.“In 1944, I was really ready,” Coachman told The Associated Press in 1996. “I had won the 50-yard dash in the national AAU six consecutive years and the 200 two years straight. I was right at my peak in 1944. I could have won at least two gold medals there.”Her only Olympic appearance came in London in 1948, when she won gold with an Olympic record jump of 5 feet, 6 1/4 inches before the Fosbury Flop was introduced. King George VI presented the gold medal to her. She made it to and from London by ship.

Read more

Alice Coachman, First Black Woman Olympic Gold Medalist, Dies at 90

Coachman won the first of her 10 straight national titles at age 16 in 1939, according to USA Track and Field, but missed the 1940 and 1944 Olympics due to World War II.

“In 1944, I was really ready,” Coachman told The Associated Press in 1996. “I had won the 50-yard dash in the national AAU six consecutive years and the 200 two years straight. I was right at my peak in 1944. I could have won at least two gold medals there.”

Her only Olympic appearance came in London in 1948, when she won gold with an Olympic record jump of 5 feet, 6 1/4 inches before the Fosbury Flop was introduced. King George VI presented the gold medal to her. She made it to and from London by ship.

Read more

14 7 / 2014

tiny-librarian:

A Pennsylvania museum has solved the mystery of a Renaissance portrait in an investigation that spans hundreds of years, layers of paint and the murdered daughter of an Italian duke.

Among the works featured in the Carnegie Museum’s exhibit Faked, Forgotten, Found is a portrait of Isabella de’Medici, the spirited favorite daughter of Cosimo de’Medici, the first Grand Duke of Florence, whose face hadn’t seen the light of day in almost 200 years.

Isabella Medici’s strong nose, steely stare and high forehead plucked of hair, as was the fashion in 1570, was hidden beneath layers of paint applied by a Victorian artist to render the work more saleable to a 19th century buyer.

The result was a pretty, bland face with rosy cheeks and gently smiling lips that Louise Lippincott, curator of fine arts at the museum, thought was a possible fake.

Before deciding to deaccession the work, Lippincott brought the painting, which was purportedly of Eleanor of Toledo, a famed beauty and the mother of Isabella de’Medici, to the Pittsburgh museum’s conservator Ellen Baxter to confirm her suspicions.

Baxter was immediately intrigued. The woman’s clothing was spot-on, with its high lace collar and richly patterned bodice, but her face was all wrong, ‘like a Victorian cookie tin box lid,’ Baxter told Carnegie Magazine.

After finding the stamp of Francis Needham on the back of the work, Baxter did some research and found that Needham worked in National Portrait Gallery in London in the mid-1800s transferring paintings from wood panels to canvas mounts.

Paintings on canvas usually have large cracks, but the ones on the Eleanor of Toledo portrait were much smaller than would be expected.

Baxter devised a theory that the work had been transferred from a wood panel onto canvas and then repainted so that the woman’s face was more pleasing to the Victorian art-buyer, some 300 years after it had been painted.

Source/Read More

(via mirousworlds)

14 7 / 2014

Judy Blume: ‘I thought, this is America: we don’t ban books. But then we did’
The award-winning author tells Alison Flood about sex, censorship and touring with a security guard


Judy Blume, tiny and smiley and as warmly open as befits the author of seminal novels about growing up Forever…, and Are You There, God? It’s Me,Margaret is sitting in a hotel in London and talking about the hate mail she has received. It comes, she says, every time she speaks out on behalf of Planned Parenthood, an American pro‑choice group for mothers.
"I went to a couple of places two years ago and I got seven hundred and something hate-mail warnings – ‘We know where you are going to be and we’ll be there waiting for you’, that sort of thing," says Blume. "My publisher sent me with a bodyguard. He was wonderful, I loved knowing he was there. And nothing happened and probably nothing would have happened, but it was very scary."
It is an incongruous revelation. Blume, 76, is the sort of author who is beloved by her fans, who stretch from the children of today to the adults who read her books when they were growing up, and were astonished at finding a novelist who spoke so clearly, so uncondescendingly, so directly, to their concerns, whether masturbation (Deenie), periods and boobs (Margaret), sex and birth control (Forever…), or death (Tiger Eyes).



Read More

Judy Blume: ‘I thought, this is America: we don’t ban books. But then we did’

The award-winning author tells Alison Flood about sex, censorship and touring with a security guard

Judy Blume, tiny and smiley and as warmly open as befits the author of seminal novels about growing up Forever…, and Are You There, God? It’s Me,Margaret is sitting in a hotel in London and talking about the hate mail she has received. It comes, she says, every time she speaks out on behalf of Planned Parenthood, an American pro‑choice group for mothers.

"I went to a couple of places two years ago and I got seven hundred and something hate-mail warnings – ‘We know where you are going to be and we’ll be there waiting for you’, that sort of thing," says Blume. "My publisher sent me with a bodyguard. He was wonderful, I loved knowing he was there. And nothing happened and probably nothing would have happened, but it was very scary."

It is an incongruous revelation. Blume, 76, is the sort of author who is beloved by her fans, who stretch from the children of today to the adults who read her books when they were growing up, and were astonished at finding a novelist who spoke so clearly, so uncondescendingly, so directly, to their concerns, whether masturbation (Deenie), periods and boobs (Margaret), sex and birth control (Forever…), or death (Tiger Eyes).

13 7 / 2014

two-browngirls:

UPPING THE AUNTY - MEERA SETHI

I’ve always loved Meera Sethi's colourful and unique work but her 'Upping the Aunty' project really changed the game. 

'Upping the Aunty' celebrates the South Asian “aunty”; her personal style and unique role in our lives. Meera flips the script on street style, by focusing her lens on aunties with swag. 

Here are some of the awesome Auntys you can find on the Tumblr page

1. Anonymous Swag Aunty - Photo: Vivek Shraya

2. Rita Aunty - Photo: Meera Sethi

3. Gunalaxsmi Aunty - Photo: Meera Sethi

4. Sita Aunty - Photo: Meera Sethi

Meera is on the lookout for contributors to the project, so If you have an aunty whose style you love, send a new or vintage photo (with your aunty’s permission) over to art@meerasethi.com!

- S

13 7 / 2014

Colbie Caillat Is Tired of Being Photoshopped: Here’s What She Did About It

Grammy Award-winning, singer-songwriter Colbie Caillat returns with a brand new EP, Gypsy Heart and a powerful new music video in which she makes a powerful statement about unfair beauty ideals by shunning hair and make-up. Here, we talk to Caillat about the man (yup!) who inspired the song, the impact of Photoshop, and why all women hate the way they look in photographs:

No, not all women hate the way they look in photographs. Generalizing in this way is actually pretty damaging and I’d recommend against it. HOWEVER, the rest of the article is worth a look.

I really enjoyed the song — well worth a listen and the video is lovely and nicely representational for skin colour, body size, and age.

13 7 / 2014

Supporting a Latin@ Scholar

I’m currently fundraising for one of my close Latin@ colleague-friends.  She’s now back in the L.A. area trying to write her dissertation and badly wants to finish to graduate in May so she can find a job and provide for her children more adequately. Her parents are exhausted by a full house of young kids and are unable to provide child care, because they have full-time jobs. What prompted this fundraiser is that my colleague is going through a divorce from her unemployed husband who is in poor mental health. In order to write and to fulfill her adjuncting teaching commitment at a local L.A. university, she needs paid child care and gas money. She is also in need of food, clothing, and diaper money for a rapidly growing family. She yearns for a modest home of their own in the LA area.  If you can help with just 20 dollars, or more, we can raise enough money to help my colleague afford paid child care this year and finish her dissertation.  The Latin@ story is one of survival in one way or another.  As an underrepresented minority in higher education, I hope you will consider donating to help my close colleague-friend have the means to pay for child care, so that she has time to write her dissertation this year.

Donate/Share

Supporting a Latin@ Scholar

I’m currently fundraising for one of my close Latin@ colleague-friends.  She’s now back in the L.A. area trying to write her dissertation and badly wants to finish to graduate in May so she can find a job and provide for her children more adequately. Her parents are exhausted by a full house of young kids and are unable to provide child care, because they have full-time jobs. What prompted this fundraiser is that my colleague is going through a divorce from her unemployed husband who is in poor mental health. In order to write and to fulfill her adjuncting teaching commitment at a local L.A. university, she needs paid child care and gas money. She is also in need of food, clothing, and diaper money for a rapidly growing family. She yearns for a modest home of their own in the LA area.  If you can help with just 20 dollars, or more, we can raise enough money to help my colleague afford paid child care this year and finish her dissertation.  The Latin@ story is one of survival in one way or another.  As an underrepresented minority in higher education, I hope you will consider donating to help my close colleague-friend have the means to pay for child care, so that she has time to write her dissertation this year.

Donate/Share