14 9 / 2014

The Season of the Witch

Why teenage girls are so dang scary.

All of this is typical girl-fear. Once you realize that The Exorcist is, essentially, the story of a 12-year-old who starts cussing, masturbating, and disobeying her mother—in other words, going through puberty—it becomes apparent to the feminist-minded viewer why two adult men are called in to slap her around for much of the third act. People are convinced that something spooky is going on with girls; that, once they reach a certain age, they lose their adorable innocence and start tapping into something powerful and forbidden. Little girls are sugar and spice, but women are just plain scary. And the moment a girl becomes a woman is the moment you fear her most.

Read more of this fantastic article

The Season of the Witch

Why teenage girls are so dang scary.

All of this is typical girl-fear. Once you realize that The Exorcist is, essentially, the story of a 12-year-old who starts cussing, masturbating, and disobeying her mother—in other words, going through puberty—it becomes apparent to the feminist-minded viewer why two adult men are called in to slap her around for much of the third act. People are convinced that something spooky is going on with girls; that, once they reach a certain age, they lose their adorable innocence and start tapping into something powerful and forbidden. Little girls are sugar and spice, but women are just plain scary. And the moment a girl becomes a woman is the moment you fear her most.

Read more of this fantastic article

14 9 / 2014

Serena Williams Is America’s Greatest Athlete

After the match, Evert said, “People kept asking Serena the last year, ‘How’s it going to feel to be in the same company with Martina and Chrissie?’ and I’m thinking to myself, Well, I’m the one who’s honored to have Serena in the same sentence.”
Forget tennis for a moment, though: when I say the greatest athlete in a generation, I mean the greatest in any sport. Sorry, LeBron. Sorry, Tiger. Sorry, Derek. For fifteen years, over two generations of tennis, Williams has been a spectacular and constant yet oddly uncherished national treasure. She is wealthy and famous, but it seems that she should be more famous, the most famous.

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Serena Williams Is America’s Greatest Athlete

After the match, Evert said, “People kept asking Serena the last year, How’s it going to feel to be in the same company with Martina and Chrissie?’ and I’m thinking to myself, Well, I’m the one who’s honored to have Serena in the same sentence.”

Forget tennis for a moment, though: when I say the greatest athlete in a generation, I mean the greatest in any sport. Sorry, LeBron. Sorry, Tiger. Sorry, Derek. For fifteen years, over two generations of tennis, Williams has been a spectacular and constant yet oddly uncherished national treasure. She is wealthy and famous, but it seems that she should be more famous, the most famous.

Read more

14 9 / 2014

Matrilineal Societies – Women with Power and Respect

A lot of Native American tribes were matrilineal instead of the typical patrilineal societies you see from Europe. This meant that you were descended from your mother’s clan, not your father’s. It was also meant the women were involved in the decision-making process for the greater good of the tribe. Some of the more well-known matrilineal socieites are the Lenape, Hopi and Iroquois. The Chickasaw were also a matrilineal society and Chickasaw.TV has a lot of great videos on the subject.Read more and watch

Matrilineal Societies – Women with Power and Respect

A lot of Native American tribes were matrilineal instead of the typical patrilineal societies you see from Europe. This meant that you were descended from your mother’s clan, not your father’s. It was also meant the women were involved in the decision-making process for the greater good of the tribe. Some of the more well-known matrilineal socieites are the Lenape, Hopi and Iroquois. The Chickasaw were also a matrilineal society and Chickasaw.TV has a lot of great videos on the subject.

Read more and watch

07 9 / 2014

"

When you are 13 years old,
the heat will be turned up too high
and the stars will not be in your favor.
You will hide behind a bookcase
with your family and everything left behind.
You will pour an ocean into a diary.
When they find you, you will be nothing
but a spark above a burning bush,
still, tell them
Despite everything, I really believe people are good at heart.

When you are 14,
a voice will call you to greatness.
When the doubters call you crazy, do not listen.
They don’t know the sound
of their own God’s whisper. Use your armor,
use your sword, use your two good hands.
Do not let their doubting
drown out the sound of your own heartbeat.
You are the Maid of Untamed Patriotism.
Born to lead armies into victory and unite a nation
like a broken heart.

When you are 15, you will be punished
for learning too proudly. A man
will climb onto your school bus and insist
your sisters name you enemy.
When you do not hide,
he will point his gun at your temple
and fire three times. Three years later,
in an ocean of words, with no apologies,
you will stand before the leaders of the world
and tell them your country is burning.

When you are 16 years old,
you will invent science fiction.
The story of a man named Frankenstein
and his creation. Soon after you will learn
that little girls with big ideas are more terrifying
than monsters, but don’t worry.
You will be remembered long after
they have put down their torches.

When you are 17 years old,
you will strike out Babe Ruth and Lou Gehrig
one right after the other.
Men will be afraid of the lightening
in your fingertips. A few days later
you will be fired from the major leagues
because “Girls are too delicate to play baseball”

You will turn 18 with a baby on your back
leading Lewis and Clark
across North America.

You will turn 18 
and become queen of the Nile.

You will turn 18 
and bring justice to journalism.

You are now 18, standing on the precipice,
trembling before your own greatness.

This is your call to leap.

There will always being those
who say you are too young and delicate
to make anything happen for yourself.
They don’t see the part of you that smolders.
Don’t let their doubting drown out the sound
of your own heartbeat.

You are the first drop of a hurricane.
Your bravery builds beyond you. You are needed
by all the little girls still living in secret,
writing oceans made of monsters and
throwing like lightening.

You don’t need to grow up to find greatness.
You are stronger than the world has ever believed you to be.
The world laid out before you to set on fire.
All you have to do
is burn.

"

04 9 / 2014


A Mighty Girl Pick of the Day: “Dangerously Ever After” by Dashka Slater. Amanita is a princess of a different stripe: she loves everything that’s dangerous. Whether it’s her pet scorpion or her bicycle with no brakes, or her dagger collection, as far as she’s concerned, it’s all wonderful. But her favorite thing is her garden, filled with the most dangerous plants in the world.So when Prince Florian from a neighboring kingdom brings her a bouquet of fluffy pink roses, Princess Amanita is unimpressed until she pricks herself on the thorns. Fascinated by the new “dangerous” flower, she asks Florian for seeds so she can grow her own roses — but instead, the flowers that grow are pink noses, and they sneeze and snore so loudly that no one can sleep! Amanita decides to set off on her own to take the nose flowers back to Florian, but she soon realizes that dangerous is a little more scary when you’re not at home in your familiar castle!This delightful and absurdly funny story features a unique princess who demonstrates just how elastic ideas of princesses and beauty can be. Illustrator Valeria Docampo’s colorful illustrations are vivid and fanciful, the perfect counterpoint to Slater’s clever text. Recommended for ages 4 to 8.To learn more about “Dangerously Ever After,” visit http://www.amightygirl.com/dangerously-ever-afterFor over 100 books starring princesses for children and teens that break the damsel in distress mold, check out A Mighty Girl’s “Ultimate Guide to the Independent Princess” at http://www.amightygirl.com/mighty-girl-picks/independent-princess

via A Mighty Girl

A Mighty Girl Pick of the Day: “Dangerously Ever After” by Dashka Slater. Amanita is a princess of a different stripe: she loves everything that’s dangerous. Whether it’s her pet scorpion or her bicycle with no brakes, or her dagger collection, as far as she’s concerned, it’s all wonderful. But her favorite thing is her garden, filled with the most dangerous plants in the world.

So when Prince Florian from a neighboring kingdom brings her a bouquet of fluffy pink roses, Princess Amanita is unimpressed until she pricks herself on the thorns. Fascinated by the new “dangerous” flower, she asks Florian for seeds so she can grow her own roses — but instead, the flowers that grow are pink noses, and they sneeze and snore so loudly that no one can sleep! Amanita decides to set off on her own to take the nose flowers back to Florian, but she soon realizes that dangerous is a little more scary when you’re not at home in your familiar castle!

This delightful and absurdly funny story features a unique princess who demonstrates just how elastic ideas of princesses and beauty can be. Illustrator Valeria Docampo’s colorful illustrations are vivid and fanciful, the perfect counterpoint to Slater’s clever text. Recommended for ages 4 to 8.

To learn more about “Dangerously Ever After,” visit http://www.amightygirl.com/dangerously-ever-after

For over 100 books starring princesses for children and teens that break the damsel in distress mold, check out A Mighty Girl’s “Ultimate Guide to the Independent Princess” at http://www.amightygirl.com/mighty-girl-picks/independent-princess

via A Mighty Girl

03 9 / 2014

03 9 / 2014

Why Aren’t People Liking My Baby’s Pics?


I’m trying my best not to be petty here, while I’m aware this is going to sound petty no matter how I put it. I believe my friends’ and family’s internalized racism and colorism is affecting their responses to photos of my child.

Here are the facts. My little girl: two black parents. My sisters’ children: multiracial (one sister’s kids are black and white, and the others have black, Caribbean and Indian heritage). On Instagram and Facebook, they are constantly being told their babies are “beautiful,” “gorgeous,” “stunning,” “unbelievably attractive” and “should be a model,” while my daughter does not receive the same level of praise. It’s a clear pattern—even my husband recognized it when I pointed it out to him.

A sense of fatigue about battling “the sociopolitical disadvantages that come with being dark-skinned in a society that continues to privilege White/Western standards of beauty” is what inspired Yaba Blay to create the transmedia project Pretty.Period. She calls the collection of photographs a “visual missive in reaction to the oh-so-popular, yet oh-so-offensive ‘compliment’—‘You’re pretty for a dark-skinned girl.’”



Read more

Why Aren’t People Liking My Baby’s Pics?

I’m trying my best not to be petty here, while I’m aware this is going to sound petty no matter how I put it. I believe my friends’ and family’s internalized racism and colorism is affecting their responses to photos of my child.

Here are the facts. My little girl: two black parents. My sisters’ children: multiracial (one sister’s kids are black and white, and the others have black, Caribbean and Indian heritage). On Instagram and Facebook, they are constantly being told their babies are “beautiful,” “gorgeous,” “stunning,” “unbelievably attractive” and “should be a model,” while my daughter does not receive the same level of praise. It’s a clear pattern—even my husband recognized it when I pointed it out to him.

A sense of fatigue about battling “the sociopolitical disadvantages that come with being dark-skinned in a society that continues to privilege White/Western standards of beauty” is what inspired Yaba Blay to create the transmedia project Pretty.Period. She calls the collection of photographs a “visual missive in reaction to the oh-so-popular, yet oh-so-offensive ‘compliment’—‘You’re pretty for a dark-skinned girl.’”

03 9 / 2014


In 1955, At age 67, Emma Gatewood, a mother of 11 and grandmother of 23, became the first woman to thru-hike the 2168-mile Appalachian Trail solo. Grandma Gatewood was also an unwitting pioneer of extreme ultra-light hiking, wearing Keds sneakers, carrying an army blanket, a raincoat, a shower curtain for shelter, a cup, and a change of clothes slung in a homemade bag over her shoulder. She gathered wild foods on the trail, supplementing them with dried beef, cheese, nuts & sausages bought in towns along the way.She hiked the entire trail again in 1960 and then again at age 75 in 1963, making her the first person to hike the trail three times. She became a bit of a national celebrity appearing on “Today Show”, Groucho Marx’ “You Bet Your Life” show and the “Tonight Show”. She also received free sneakers from Keds.
via

In 1955, At age 67, Emma Gatewood, a mother of 11 and grandmother of 23, became the first woman to thru-hike the 2168-mile Appalachian Trail solo. Grandma Gatewood was also an unwitting pioneer of extreme ultra-light hiking, wearing Keds sneakers, carrying an army blanket, a raincoat, a shower curtain for shelter, a cup, and a change of clothes slung in a homemade bag over her shoulder. She gathered wild foods on the trail, supplementing them with dried beef, cheese, nuts & sausages bought in towns along the way.

She hiked the entire trail again in 1960 and then again at age 75 in 1963, making her the first person to hike the trail three times. She became a bit of a national celebrity appearing on “Today Show”, Groucho Marx’ “You Bet Your Life” show and the “Tonight Show”. She also received free sneakers from Keds.

via

02 9 / 2014

Blind women get married too

Families can have a specific picture in their head of what a bride will look like; people on the street will even have images in their head. I am not that picture. It is no one’s fault though, it’s the fault of the Wedding Industrial Complex. The WIC likes to project the image of a bride to be one specific thing, possibly so that we all try to look like their models. Which would be why I’ve always envisioned myself as having an “offbeat” wedding.
I am not wearing a veil, because I know that it would prevent me from using what peripheral vision I DO have. I am not wearing a white dress, because I would not be able to see the detail on my own dress. I am walking down the aisle by myself because the idea of a bunch of people on either side of me and one person really close to me makes me very nervous.
And this doesn’t really get across with some people.
Within three days of becoming engaged, I had already been told that I shouldn’t wear my glasses, because they’re not bridal. I was told my cane wasn’t bridal. I was told my eye (featured above) was not bridal.
And I realized that if I was going to be “bridal” in their eyes, I was going to have to change who I am. I am proudly disabled. I am the blind woman who moved across the country by herself to live in New York City. I am the blind woman who has done sword fighting and parkour. I am the blind woman who loves to lindy hop on a crowded dance floor — and I will not change to meet what the Wedding Industry believes is bridal.

Read more

Blind women get married too

Families can have a specific picture in their head of what a bride will look like; people on the street will even have images in their head. I am not that picture. It is no one’s fault though, it’s the fault of the Wedding Industrial Complex. The WIC likes to project the image of a bride to be one specific thing, possibly so that we all try to look like their models. Which would be why I’ve always envisioned myself as having an “offbeat” wedding.

I am not wearing a veil, because I know that it would prevent me from using what peripheral vision I DO have. I am not wearing a white dress, because I would not be able to see the detail on my own dress. I am walking down the aisle by myself because the idea of a bunch of people on either side of me and one person really close to me makes me very nervous.

And this doesn’t really get across with some people.

Within three days of becoming engaged, I had already been told that I shouldn’t wear my glasses, because they’re not bridal. I was told my cane wasn’t bridal. I was told my eye (featured above) was not bridal.

And I realized that if I was going to be “bridal” in their eyes, I was going to have to change who I am. I am proudly disabled. I am the blind woman who moved across the country by herself to live in New York City. I am the blind woman who has done sword fighting and parkour. I am the blind woman who loves to lindy hop on a crowded dance floor — and I will not change to meet what the Wedding Industry believes is bridal.

Read more

02 9 / 2014

Columbia Student Will Carry Her Mattress Until Her Rapist Exits School

Columbia University senior Emma Sulkowicz (who we have written about before) has taken her experience attending college with her rapist and turned it into her senior thesis project. “It’s endurance performance art piece,” Sulkowicz told the Columbia Daily Spectator about the endeavor, for which she will carry her mattress around to every one of her classes until her rapist is either expelled or chooses to leave the school.

via Jezebel