27 8 / 2014


The beatas and alumbradas of Spain were persecuted by the Spanish Inquisition, which was determined to stamp out “marvels” among unauthorized persons. Women in the Inquisition: Spain and the New World, 1999 (ed. Mary E. Giles, Baltimore: Johns Hopkins U Press) has some extraordinary stories about them. The book refers to trance, visions, ecstatic practices, and healing by the beatas (“blessed women,” who gathered in beaterios and ritual prayer groups called oratorios) and alumbradas (“illuminated women”).
Inés of Herrera del Duque, known as the Prophetess of Extremadura, had visions and dreams, and counseled people. Francisca Hernández (1530) was “reputed to have extraordinary healing powers” as well as spiritual guidance.
Ana Dominga who was tried by Barcelona Inquisition and jailed for six months in 1610, was a “beata profesa” described by the author as “an itinerant holy woman whose exuberant prayer scandalized her companions.” (But she was also religiously very conservative, self-derogating, and into flagellation). A lot of these women were into fasting, which could be seen as either churchly mortification of the body, or an ascetic path to altered states.
María de Jesús de Agreda was a mystic renowned for her trances, levitation, and most famously, for bi-locating to New Mexico. She’d go into ecstatic trance after taking communion. Was tried several times by the Inquisition in its campaign aimed at “stopping individuals who publicly displayed trances, speaking in tongues, and other spectacular forms of behavior.” It also cracked down on “acts of unmediated [by the priesthood] contact with the Divine or the demonic.” (All depends on interpretation, there’s the rub.) In 1624 she underwent an auto-da-fe (not executed though) with six other alumbrada women, and three men, and one corpse.
One author in the anthology describes alumbradismo as “primarily a female transgression associated with women who reported visionary experiences.” Yet some clerics sought out such women as spiritual directors. One such was Maria Catalina de Jesús, a miracle worker who led a group of alumbrados in Seville with nearly 700 members; the Inquisition sentenced her to public penance and two years of labor as a hospital servant (a common punishment of the Sp Inq).
Another of these recognized leaders (not by the institutional hierarchy) was the beata Isabel de la Cruz, in the 1500s known “as the true mother and teacher of all the alumbrados.” And then there are into the syncretic cross-confessional ties of this movement: “Both Sufis and alumbrados underwent individual trances and group experiences that sometimes became extravagant expressions of emotion with dancing, weeping, ecstatic shouts, incomprehensible speech, and prophecies.” This threatened the powers that were, and they set about crushing the beatas and their oratorios (prayer gatherings).

Shown, Beata Francisca de Paula de Jesus, known among her Brazilian people as Nhá Chica (Aunt Francie), who died in 1895 and who unlike the women described above, received recognition by the hierarchy. But the beatas of 16th and 17th century Spain would have looked very like her.


source: 
Suppressed Histories Archives

The beatas and alumbradas of Spain were persecuted by the Spanish Inquisition, which was determined to stamp out “marvels” among unauthorized persons. Women in the Inquisition: Spain and the New World, 1999 (ed. Mary E. Giles, Baltimore: Johns Hopkins U Press) has some extraordinary stories about them. The book refers to trance, visions, ecstatic practices, and healing by the beatas (“blessed women,” who gathered in beaterios and ritual prayer groups called oratorios) and alumbradas (“illuminated women”).

Inés of Herrera del Duque, known as the Prophetess of Extremadura, had visions and dreams, and counseled people. Francisca Hernández (1530) was “reputed to have extraordinary healing powers” as well as spiritual guidance.

Ana Dominga who was tried by Barcelona Inquisition and jailed for six months in 1610, was a “beata profesa” described by the author as “an itinerant holy woman whose exuberant prayer scandalized her companions.” (But she was also religiously very conservative, self-derogating, and into flagellation). A lot of these women were into fasting, which could be seen as either churchly mortification of the body, or an ascetic path to altered states.

María de Jesús de Agreda was a mystic renowned for her trances, levitation, and most famously, for bi-locating to New Mexico. She’d go into ecstatic trance after taking communion. Was tried several times by the Inquisition in its campaign aimed at “stopping individuals who publicly displayed trances, speaking in tongues, and other spectacular forms of behavior.” It also cracked down on “acts of unmediated [by the priesthood] contact with the Divine or the demonic.” (All depends on interpretation, there’s the rub.) In 1624 she underwent an auto-da-fe (not executed though) with six other alumbrada women, and three men, and one corpse.

One author in the anthology describes alumbradismo as “primarily a female transgression associated with women who reported visionary experiences.” Yet some clerics sought out such women as spiritual directors. One such was Maria Catalina de Jesús, a miracle worker who led a group of alumbrados in Seville with nearly 700 members; the Inquisition sentenced her to public penance and two years of labor as a hospital servant (a common punishment of the Sp Inq).

Another of these recognized leaders (not by the institutional hierarchy) was the beata Isabel de la Cruz, in the 1500s known “as the true mother and teacher of all the alumbrados.” And then there are into the syncretic cross-confessional ties of this movement: “Both Sufis and alumbrados underwent individual trances and group experiences that sometimes became extravagant expressions of emotion with dancing, weeping, ecstatic shouts, incomprehensible speech, and prophecies.” This threatened the powers that were, and they set about crushing the beatas and their oratorios (prayer gatherings).

Shown, Beata Francisca de Paula de Jesus, known among her Brazilian people as Nhá Chica (Aunt Francie), who died in 1895 and who unlike the women described above, received recognition by the hierarchy. But the beatas of 16th and 17th century Spain would have looked very like her.

source: 

Suppressed Histories Archives

26 8 / 2014

26 8 / 2014

26 8 / 2014

25 8 / 2014


Althea Gibson was born 87 years ago today [Aug 25]. Often called the female Jackie Robinson, Gibson was a professional tennis player and golfer and the first black athlete to cross the color line in international tennis. In 1956 she became the first black player to win a Grand Slam title (French Open). She went on to win 11 Grand Slam tournaments and was inducted into the International Tennis Hall of Fame. In the early 1960s, she also became the first black player to compete on the women’s professional golf tour. Gibson died in 2003. 
[x]

Althea Gibson was born 87 years ago today [Aug 25]. Often called the female Jackie Robinson, Gibson was a professional tennis player and golfer and the first black athlete to cross the color line in international tennis. In 1956 she became the first black player to win a Grand Slam title (French Open). She went on to win 11 Grand Slam tournaments and was inducted into the International Tennis Hall of Fame. In the early 1960s, she also became the first black player to compete on the women’s professional golf tour. Gibson died in 2003. 

[x]

25 8 / 2014

#StopTheBeautyMadness Campaign

There Comes A Time When You Have Simply Had Enough.

Enough of the impossible standards. Enough of the “ideal” image. Most of all, enough of the feeling of NOT ENOUGH when it comes to your own beauty. There also comes a time when an entire culture of women have had it. When blogs and ad campaigns and AS-IS selfie pictures start to change the rules of the game.

That time is now. That culture is this culture. 

Today, there is more than a choir singing out the truths of true beauty. There is a great groundswell and the numbers are rising daily. We are a new tribe, and we know it is time to take back the streets-OUR streets. We know that begins with lifting our self-esteem, our self-imposed standards of worth, and honoring our deepest truths about what it means to be “enough.”

~~~~~~~~~

Robin Rice is the Creative Director of the Stop The Beauty Madness campaign and President of our sponsor company, Be Who You Are Productions, Inc. She offers a monthly membership program mentoring small business owners and other professionals around “work as a soul path” at WorkAsASoulPath.com. Robin is a mentor to world-level leaders through Rainmaker Consulting, “changing the lives of people who are changing the world.” She is an internationally published author (if you love this website, you will love her novel Venus For A Day) and a self-proclaimed Social Change Artist. Learn more about all of Robin’s work at BeWhoYouAre.com

25 8 / 2014

24 8 / 2014

Female Bricklayer Defied Doubters To Build Baltimore Landmarks

When Barbara Moore started working as a bricklayer in 1973, the 21-year-old was the only woman in Baltimore doing the job.
It wasn’t the first job she’d tried, but a desk job, she says, just wasn’t the right fit. “Right out of high school I worked in a[n] office, but a couple hours behind a desk and I was falling asleep,” Moore tells her daughter, Olivia Fite, on a visit to StoryCorps in Baltimore. “So I became a bricklayer.”
"It was kind of rough at first ‘cause, you know, a lot of the older guys didn’t think I should be there and I was taking a job from a man," Moore says. "But I believed that I could do that job."



And she was right. 








Read more/listen to story

Female Bricklayer Defied Doubters To Build Baltimore Landmarks

When Barbara Moore started working as a bricklayer in 1973, the 21-year-old was the only woman in Baltimore doing the job.

It wasn’t the first job she’d tried, but a desk job, she says, just wasn’t the right fit. “Right out of high school I worked in a[n] office, but a couple hours behind a desk and I was falling asleep,” Moore tells her daughter, Olivia Fite, on a visit to StoryCorps in Baltimore. “So I became a bricklayer.”

"It was kind of rough at first ‘cause, you know, a lot of the older guys didn’t think I should be there and I was taking a job from a man," Moore says. "But I believed that I could do that job."

And she was right. 

23 8 / 2014

5 FACTS YOU SHOULD KNOW ABOUT WOMEN WHO SHAPED MODERN PHYSICS

Theoretical physicist (and TED Fellow) Shohini Ghose has two great passions: physics, and advocating for gender equity in the sciences. “There are still relatively few women in physics – and the higher up the ladder in academia or industry you go, the fewer women you find,” says Ghose. “Yet the laws of physics themselves are gender neutral, and the beauty of the universe is equally accessible to everyone. So why so few women, and how can we change that?”

Recently, we asked Ghose to share five of her favorite facts about women and their contribution to physics. Here they are:

READ MORE

5 FACTS YOU SHOULD KNOW ABOUT WOMEN WHO SHAPED MODERN PHYSICS

Theoretical physicist (and TED Fellow) Shohini Ghose has two great passions: physics, and advocating for gender equity in the sciences. “There are still relatively few women in physics – and the higher up the ladder in academia or industry you go, the fewer women you find,” says Ghose. “Yet the laws of physics themselves are gender neutral, and the beauty of the universe is equally accessible to everyone. So why so few women, and how can we change that?”

Recently, we asked Ghose to share five of her favorite facts about women and their contribution to physics. Here they are:

READ MORE

23 8 / 2014

Math’s Highest Honor Is Given To A Woman For The First Time

Four mathematicians were today awarded the Fields Medal, including Iranian Maryam Mirzakhani, the first female mathematician to be given the honor that’s often called math’s equivalent of the Nobel Prize.
Mirzakhani, 37, is a professor at Stanford University and was honored in Seoul, South Korea, for her “striking and highly original contributions to geometry and dynamical systems.”
Here’s more from Stanford:



"The award recognizes Mirzakhani’s sophisticated and highly original contributions to the fields of geometry and dynamical systems, particularly in understanding the symmetry of curved surfaces, such as spheres, the surfaces of doughnuts and of hyperbolic objects. Although her work is considered ‘pure mathematics’ and is mostly theoretical, it has implications for physics and quantum field theory."





In the statement, she said that as a young girl she dreamed of becoming a writer. But by high school, math problems and proofs had caught her attention.

"It is fun — it’s like solving a puzzle or connecting the dots in a detective case," she said. "I felt that this was something I could do, and I wanted to pursue this path."

Read more

Math’s Highest Honor Is Given To A Woman For The First Time

Four mathematicians were today awarded the Fields Medal, including Iranian Maryam Mirzakhani, the first female mathematician to be given the honor that’s often called math’s equivalent of the Nobel Prize.

Mirzakhani, 37, is a professor at Stanford University and was honored in Seoul, South Korea, for her “striking and highly original contributions to geometry and dynamical systems.”

Here’s more from Stanford:

"The award recognizes Mirzakhani’s sophisticated and highly original contributions to the fields of geometry and dynamical systems, particularly in understanding the symmetry of curved surfaces, such as spheres, the surfaces of doughnuts and of hyperbolic objects. Although her work is considered ‘pure mathematics’ and is mostly theoretical, it has implications for physics and quantum field theory."

In the statement, she said that as a young girl she dreamed of becoming a writer. But by high school, math problems and proofs had caught her attention.

"It is fun — it’s like solving a puzzle or connecting the dots in a detective case," she said. "I felt that this was something I could do, and I wanted to pursue this path."

Read more