27 7 / 2014

Open Letter to Phyllis Schlafly From 12 Year-Old Madison Kimrey

Dear Ms. Schlafly,
I’m a teenage girl who has been reading about you quite a bit in the news lately. It seems to me that you have absolutely no idea what women of my generation are all about. I can understand that because I often deal with older people who think that their generation is superior and my generation is the worst thing ever just because we’re different. Really though, I think since you want to be all up in the public eye, it would really do you a lot of good to understand things from the perspective of one of the young women who will be taking over this country soon.
I’ve been thinking about how I can explain what feminism means to my generation in a way you might not have thought of before. I wanted to try to work from something we have in common, and it’s been kind of hard to find something I have in common with you. Then, it came to me. I bet you wear a bra.
[…]
What you’re doing, Ms. Schlafly, is contributing to something very disturbing I see happening with some of the teenage girls I know. At a time in their lives when they should be free, independent, and exploring and preparing for the possibilities they have in the future, many of them are worried about getting or keeping a boyfriend. There are young women my age who are extremely smart but they hide it because they get messages from women like you that if they are too smart or successful, boys won’t like them. They get messages from women like you that pleasing a man should be their number one goal. You’re contributing to making young women uncomfortable when they go bra shopping because they’ve learned to analyze every choice based on what other people will think instead of having the freedom and confidence to choose what’s best for them.

Read more

Open Letter to Phyllis Schlafly From 12 Year-Old Madison Kimrey

Dear Ms. Schlafly,

I’m a teenage girl who has been reading about you quite a bit in the news lately. It seems to me that you have absolutely no idea what women of my generation are all about. I can understand that because I often deal with older people who think that their generation is superior and my generation is the worst thing ever just because we’re different. Really though, I think since you want to be all up in the public eye, it would really do you a lot of good to understand things from the perspective of one of the young women who will be taking over this country soon.

I’ve been thinking about how I can explain what feminism means to my generation in a way you might not have thought of before. I wanted to try to work from something we have in common, and it’s been kind of hard to find something I have in common with you. Then, it came to me. I bet you wear a bra.

[…]

What you’re doing, Ms. Schlafly, is contributing to something very disturbing I see happening with some of the teenage girls I know. At a time in their lives when they should be free, independent, and exploring and preparing for the possibilities they have in the future, many of them are worried about getting or keeping a boyfriend. There are young women my age who are extremely smart but they hide it because they get messages from women like you that if they are too smart or successful, boys won’t like them. They get messages from women like you that pleasing a man should be their number one goal. You’re contributing to making young women uncomfortable when they go bra shopping because they’ve learned to analyze every choice based on what other people will think instead of having the freedom and confidence to choose what’s best for them.

Read more

27 7 / 2014

"The reason women are turning you down for casual sex seems to be that, for one thing, a lot of you are calling them sluts afterward. Also, a lot of you aren’t bothering to try to be good in bed."

Terri Conley, professor of psychology and women’s studies at the University of Michigan ( link )

welp.

(via glimpseofgoldglitter)

image

This is my most favorite post I have ever seen in the history of the world. 

(via sharipep)

umm..yeah.

(via thecoolintellectual)

(via fullbodiedlovin)

26 7 / 2014

by Jenny Block

26 7 / 2014

"We think that the point is to pass the test or overcome the problem, but the truth is that things don’t really get solved. They come together and they fall apart. Then they come together again and fall apart again. It’s just like that. The healing comes from letting there be room for all of this to happen: room for grief, for relief, for misery, for joy."

Pema Chodron
(From her book When Things Fall Apart)

26 7 / 2014

Every day we hear the horrible stories of young people being bullied. But rarely do we get to hear from … drumroll please … the bully herself. Listening to Mariah, I’m reminded of the amazing things that can happen when girls aren’t afraid to share their stories, change their lives, and live with compassion and truth.

Sophia Bush via Upworthy

25 7 / 2014

FEMME is an inspirational voyage about women around the world who are actively transforming and healing global society of a daily basis. Starring Sharon Stone (Casino, Total Recall, Basic Instinct), Jean Houston, Marianne Williamson, Jean Shinoda Bolen, Riane Eisler, Nobel Peace Prize Laureats Shirin Ebadi and Mairead Maguire, Rickie Lee Jones, Gloria Steinem, and more! Influential women discuss religion, science, history, politics and entertainment - and the solutions to the multiple crisis we face throughout the world. FEMME focuses on utilizing a feminine approach with nurturing energy to inspire a new hope for the future.

http://femmethemovie.com

25 7 / 2014


"The Nazis called them ‘Night Witches’ because the whooshing noise their plywood and canvas airplanes made reminded the Germans of the sound of a witch’s broomstick. The Russian women who piloted those planes, onetime crop dusters, took it as a compliment. In 30,000 missions over four years, they dumped 23,000 tons of bombs on the German invaders, ultimately helping to chase them back to Berlin. Any German pilot who downed a ‘witch’ was awarded an Iron Cross.These young heroines, all volunteers and most in their teens and early 20s, became legends of World War II but are now largely forgotten. Flying only in the dark, they had no parachutes, guns, radios or radar, only maps and compasses. If hit by tracer bullets, their planes would burn like sheets of paper.”So begins a NY Times tribute to one of the most famous “Night Witches,” Nadezhda Popova, pictured here. Popova, who flew 852 missions during the war, passed away this past year at the age of 91. To read more about her incredible story, visithttp://nyti.ms/JbnOMCWhile there aren’t any books available for young readers about these courageous women, there are several books for older readers about the role of Russian women combat pilots during WWII including “Flying for Her Country: The American and Soviet Women Military Pilots of World War II” (http://amzn.to/1mTMad9), “Wings, Women, and War: Soviet Airwomen in World War II Combat” (http://amzn.to/1fyPOs8), “A Dance with Death: Soviet Airwomen in World War II” (http://amzn.to/1jJb79N), “Red Sky, Black Death: A Soviet Woman Pilot’s Memoir of the Eastern Front” (http://amzn.to/NhxvM4).For an excellent documentary for ages 10 and up about the WASPs, the American women flyers of WWII, check out “Fly Girls,” at http://www.amightygirl.com/american-experience-fly-girls For more true stories of courageous women heroes of WWII, check out the inspiring book for ages 13 and up “Women Heroes of World War II: 26 Stories of Espionage, Sabotage, Resistance, and Rescue” athttp://www.amightygirl.com/women-heroes-of-world-war-iiFor two highly recommended novels, both for ages 13 and up, about women resistance fighters of WWII, check out “Code Name Verity” (http://www.amightygirl.com/code-name-verity) and “Rose Under Fire” (http://www.amightygirl.com/rose-under-fire).For stories for all ages about girls and women living through the WWII period, visit our “WWII / Holocaust” section at http://www.amightygirl.com/books/history-biography/history-world?cat=186And, to introduce your kids to more famous female flyers like Amelia Earhart, Bessie Coleman, and Harriet Quimby, visit A Mighty Girl’s “Planes” section at http://www.amightygirl.com/books/general-interest/transportation?cat=129

[x]

"The Nazis called them ‘Night Witches’ because the whooshing noise their plywood and canvas airplanes made reminded the Germans of the sound of a witch’s broomstick. The Russian women who piloted those planes, onetime crop dusters, took it as a compliment. In 30,000 missions over four years, they dumped 23,000 tons of bombs on the German invaders, ultimately helping to chase them back to Berlin. Any German pilot who downed a ‘witch’ was awarded an Iron Cross.

These young heroines, all volunteers and most in their teens and early 20s, became legends of World War II but are now largely forgotten. Flying only in the dark, they had no parachutes, guns, radios or radar, only maps and compasses. If hit by tracer bullets, their planes would burn like sheets of paper.”

So begins a NY Times tribute to one of the most famous “Night Witches,” Nadezhda Popova, pictured here. Popova, who flew 852 missions during the war, passed away this past year at the age of 91. To read more about her incredible story, visithttp://nyti.ms/JbnOMC

While there aren’t any books available for young readers about these courageous women, there are several books for older readers about the role of Russian women combat pilots during WWII including “Flying for Her Country: The American and Soviet Women Military Pilots of World War II” (http://amzn.to/1mTMad9), “Wings, Women, and War: Soviet Airwomen in World War II Combat” (http://amzn.to/1fyPOs8), “A Dance with Death: Soviet Airwomen in World War II” (http://amzn.to/1jJb79N), “Red Sky, Black Death: A Soviet Woman Pilot’s Memoir of the Eastern Front” (http://amzn.to/NhxvM4).

For an excellent documentary for ages 10 and up about the WASPs, the American women flyers of WWII, check out “Fly Girls,” at http://www.amightygirl.com/american-experience-fly-girls 

For more true stories of courageous women heroes of WWII, check out the inspiring book for ages 13 and up “Women Heroes of World War II: 26 Stories of Espionage, Sabotage, Resistance, and Rescue” athttp://www.amightygirl.com/women-heroes-of-world-war-ii

For two highly recommended novels, both for ages 13 and up, about women resistance fighters of WWII, check out “Code Name Verity” (http://www.amightygirl.com/code-name-verity) and “Rose Under Fire” (http://www.amightygirl.com/rose-under-fire).

For stories for all ages about girls and women living through the WWII period, visit our “WWII / Holocaust” section at http://www.amightygirl.com/books/history-biography/history-world?cat=186

And, to introduce your kids to more famous female flyers like Amelia Earhart, Bessie Coleman, and Harriet Quimby, visit A Mighty Girl’s “Planes” section at http://www.amightygirl.com/books/general-interest/transportation?cat=129

[x]

25 7 / 2014

Jamila Lyiscott is a “tri-tongued orator;” in her powerful spoken-word essay “Broken English,” she celebrates — and challenges — the three distinct flavors of English she speaks with her friends, in the classroom and with her parents. As she explores the complicated history and present-day identity that each language represents, she unpacks what it means to be “articulate.”

18 7 / 2014

lightspeedsound:

elizajumel:

the first female chinese immigrant to america was a sixteen-year-old girl who was part of a cultural exhibit where she sat in a life-size diorama and people watched her eat with chopsticks while wearing silk clothes and that’s really all you need to know about the commodification of chinese women

It would be really great if you included her name in this post tho.

her name was Afong Moy, stage name “The Chinese Lady.”

And here is more information

(Source: watermillions, via angrywocunited)

17 7 / 2014

Nadine Gordimer, South African author, dies at 90

Gordimer’s family said she “cared most deeply about South Africa, its culture, its people, and its ongoing struggle to realise its new democracy”.

Committed to fighting apartheid, the author was a leading member of the African National Congress (ANC) and fought for the release of Nelson Mandela.

They went on to become firm friends and she edited Mandela’s famous I Am Prepared To Die speech, which he gave as a defendant during his 1962 trial.

The Nelson Mandela Foundation paid tribute to Gordimer, saying it was “deeply saddened at the loss of South Africa’s grande dame of literature”.

"We have lost a great writer, a patriot and strong voice for equality and democracy in the world," it added.

A number of Gordimer’s books were banned by the South African government under the apartheid regime including 1966’s The Late Bourgeois World and 1979’s Burger’s Daughter.

Her last novel, No Time Like the Present, published in 2012, follows veterans of the battle against apartheid as they deal with the issues facing modern South Africa.

Read more